DT Project: Concussions in Youth Sports

Empathize: After doing research with my partner, Sophia, we noticed a huge affect of concussions on teenagers and children, due to sports and physical activity. Headcase company mentions how 47% of concussions in a survey in 2012 were during high school football. Many athletes who play physical contact sports such as football, basketball, and wrestling tend to have a higher risk of getting hurt and succumbing to possible head injuries such as concussions.

Define: According to Mayoclinic, a concussion is a traumatic brain injury that alters the way your brain functions, while Medlineplus describes it as a short loss of normal brain function in response to a head injury. Both of these definitions show how dangerous and harmful this injury can be on a person, let alone a child not fully grown. Concussions are treated ultimately by rest. However, even though limited activities and avoiding physical exertion may seem easy, it is very common for people to “ignore” these rules and get back quickly to their normal lives. This is where things can go terribly wrong, and one could actually get worse. When talking about concussions with athletes, it is very important and strongly advised, according to Mayoclinic, to always wear protective gear with any contact sport, regular exercise, and to inform your peers and teammates about the dangers of concussions.

Ideate: Sophia and I came up with the idea of talking to several athletes who have suffered from concussions. After researching with Sports concussion, it mentioned the prevention of concussions in ways of simply respecting the rules of the sport, examining the field, and learning proper techniques to stay aware of ones surroundings and safety. We came up with the idea of first coming up with a written test of what to ask these athletes. The questions ultimately ask about concussions to get a feel for how much they really know about concussions, and to see if they realize the intensity and severity of this subject.

Prototype: After answering the questionnaire, we created a youtube video explaining all of the information needed about concussions. After each athlete watched the video, we had them take the test again. After having about ten different athletes take the quiz, we got feedback we didn’t really want to see, which was that these athletes did not know much about the dangers of concussions and any of the specifics! This is where our video came into play. The second quiz went up in scores to almost 100% for each girl after watching our informative video. This simply shows that even though athletes know a lot about their sports, some may not be aware of the serious dangers that could come about with injuries. Being informed and aware of what could happen, in order to maintain safety is very important — specifically to those who constantly play contact sports. We decided to tell these girls to spread our video around to those who did not try this quiz out who play sports and do not know much about concussions, or even girls who have suffered from concussions and just want to learn more! There are many ways to stay aware about staying safe and healthy, and this is just one simple way to get the message across!

Here are some images of a couple of the girls we had test this out! They are all watching the youtube video.

 

 

 

 

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2 thoughts on “DT Project: Concussions in Youth Sports

  1. Antonia Ehlers

    Hi Tiffany! I really liked your blog post! You did an amazing job with description and your facts were on it. I also thought you did a great job hyperlinking everything. You and Sophia seemed like you knew what you were doing!! Also, I loved the youtube video! 🙂

    Like

  2. Hey Tiffany,
    First, I loved working with you on this project, you made it really easy to communicate and brainstorm with you. I like how you layed out all of our project in this post and clearly explained all of it. I also like the pictures!
    -Sophia

    Like

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